The Lawrenceville School: In-Depth School Profile

lawrencevilleFive miles south of Princeton, sprawling across a pristine, rural 700 acres in central New Jersey, is the Lawrenceville School. A prestigious boarding school founded in 1810, the Lawrenceville School was proud home to graduates Malcolm Forbes, economist George Akerlof, and musician Huey Lewis, and ranked number fourteen in the 2010 Forbes survey of America’s Best Prep Schools. With a relatively small student to faculty ratio, generous financial aid, and a unique House System and Harkness Teaching model, the Lawrenceville School is an attractive choice for high school students intent on developing “high standards of character and scholarship, a passion for learning, an appreciation for diversity, a global perspective, and strong commitments to personal, community, and environmental responsibility.”

The Lawrenceville School will be the first profile in my new series investigating the private and public high schools of Mercer County.

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Want to teach in China? PT International is recruiting!

Teach in China!

PT International has successfully recruited applicants for teaching opportunities in Asia since 2007.

We are currently looking  for several test prep teachers for exciting, rewarding, and well-compensated positions with our partner organizations in China. Opportunities are available in Shanghai, Beijing, Hong Kong, Guangzhou, and Shenzhen.We are currently looking for several test prep teachers

Annual compensation is highly competitive and commensurate with experience.

Additionally, all positions include:

  • full airfare reimbursement and airport pickups
  • housing assistance
  • comprehensive training
  • generous amount of paid vacation
  • opportunity for performance bonuses

These are immediate hiring needs – we are looking to onboard our first group of teachers on March 1st so apply soon!

Please visit www.princetontutoring.com/teach-abroad for detailed job descriptions and application instructions. Good luck!

Please feel free to forward to anybody who might be interested.

ABOUT PT INTERNATIONAL:

PT Intl is the international recruiting arm of Princeton Tutoring, an educational services company founded in 2005 by brothers Greg and Kevin Wong, both Princeton University graduates. Domestically, we provide premium one-on-one academic subject tutoring, test prep, and college counseling services. Our instructors, who also act as role models and mentors, are the highest performing students and graduates from Ivy-plus universities. Our College Counseling program is headed by former Admissions Officers from Princeton University and New York University.

Internationally, we specialize in recruiting elite teachers for amazing teaching opportunities with our partners in Asia. We have significant experience working in Asia and understand first-hand the difficulties that applicants face when searching for legitimate teaching opportunities abroad. We partner only with the most highly regarded programs, the majority of which are run by like-minded Ivy-League expats from the States. This ensures that our teachers are safe, treated fairly, and have overwhelmingly positive experiences.

Literary Terms and Devices Part III: Finding Meaning

1001_findingmeaning_mailer_facebookMy previous posts on literary terms have focused on two major uses of these special devices: understanding and approaching texts and, importantly, writing about them. Here we will emphasize one further purpose: locating meaning. Yes, that could mean anything! But in writing and reading literature, meaning is everything. Training your brain and eye to search for underlying meaning in what you read (and even what you experience in daily life) will teach you to be a better reader, writer, and observer of the world. How is this accomplished in texts? Read on to find out!

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Conquering the SAT Essay in under 25 Minutes

Of course, 25 minutes to write a full-length essay that is also meant to be descriptive, detailed, and persuasive seems a little too much like a Herculean task. They must be joking! They can’t possibly be serious about only giving us 25 minutes to write an essay for the SAT. They must really mean that we are meant to take the 25 minutes to think about an essay plan! I remember the first time I attempted the essay section, it took me the full 25 minutes to write 2 short paragraphs. Nearly every student I’ve met has felt frustration at the short time limit in the SAT writing section. However, there is hope and, similar to every other part of the SAT, the SAT essay can also be conquered with a few easy strategies.

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[Continue reading to find out how you can conquer the SAT essay in under 25 minutes…]

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Literary Terms and Devices Part II: Approaching Texts

toneFor those of you preparing for AP English Literature exam (May 2015) this summer, read on! For those preparing for essay sections on the ACT or SAT, bookmark this blog post. While we focused on generally foundational literary terms last week (metaphor/simile, symbol, allusion, hyperbole, and irony), today’s post highlights terms you should definitely stow in your tool bag for those essay portions of college entrance exams. These big guys (diction, syntax, tone, mood, imagery, and denotation/connotation) are all top contenders for analyzing a literary passage and most importantly, writing about it clearly and effectively.

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Literary Terms and Devices Part I: Your Tools to Texts

metaphorJust what are “literary terms” anyways? Although they are certainly not for the faint of heart, literary terms are not reserved for future English majors, writers, and lifetime bookworms. Think of literary terms as tools to store with all that other luggage you rely on when reading a text, writing an essay, or encountering literature. Understanding these terms will mean possessing a vocabulary that will help you approach any text at any time. Convinced yet? Good! Let’s start building that literary backbone!

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Acing SAT Math!

Of the three SAT sections – reading, writing, and math – the math section is perhaps the easiest section that one can prepare for and perhaps the only section that one can prepare completely for. The majority of math problems tested are not advanced level math and require a certain basic knowledge of the topic. Yet, the SAT math section can often be intimidating for many students because although the material rarely exceeds what they have learnt in school, the presentation and format of questions are usually different. The method of scoring is also very different – committing a computational error will not earn you any partial credit.

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[Continue reading to find out how to best prepare for SAT Math…]

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What is a good SAT score?

Each student taking the SAT wonders about what score would be a good one. Is 2100 good? Or would only a perfect 2400 be considered a good score? However, instead of asking what score is a good one, perhaps the more important question is to ask, “Which college do you want to go to?” Different colleges have different SAT score ranges amongst their admitted applicants. Some colleges have an average admitted SAT score of 2250, whereas other colleges have an average admitted SAT score of 1950. There really isn’t one set ‘good’ SAT score. This is the first thing any student must remember.

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[Continue reading to find out what a good SAT score is…]

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Breaking Down Critical Reading

Although reading is an ability that seems to come naturally to many of us, the area of reading comprehension always seems to trip us up on the SAT. The passages, albeit not difficult in themselves, suddenly seem to become incredibly hard to decipher during the test. What is the author trying to say? How do I know the author is trying to convey this particular emotion? All of a sudden, reading, or at least critical reading, no longer seems like a walk in the park. You might have realized that critical reading requires a certain way of thinking that is usually unfamiliar to many of us. But fret not, because this unfamiliarity can be overcome with practice!

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(Picture source: Sacredheart.org)

[Continue reading to find out how you can practice critical reading…]

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How to Separate the Good from the Bad on the SAT – Part 6

This is the last post in the series of How to Separate the Good from the Bad! But, all of the previous tips mentioned don’t just work without any practice. You will need to consistently remind yourself of them and integrate them until they become automatic processes that are ingrained without your memory. The SAT takes work, but fret not because your hard work can pay off! Now, on to this last tip!

guessing numbers(Picture source: Adrienne Heger)

[Continue reading to find out what the last tip is…]

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